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WNYers keep close eye on creek levels

WEST SENECA, N.Y. (WIVB) – Fear and anxiety are far from over, even though the snow has ended in South Buffalo and the southtowns. People in the hard hit areas are anxious and worried about the possibility of flooding.

Residents are keeping a close eye on creeks, Monday.  The mayor deployed the Center for Employment Opportunities to help shovel out elderly citizens.

The organization’s senior supervisor says they have a couple dozen people out shoveling, working to help people who’ve been stuck in their homes. They’ve been out for the past few days to provide aid to those who can’t physically do it themselves.

“It’s so gratifying to help an elderly person out that’s stuck in the house. Some of the couldn’t even get out of their doors the snow was so high. Just to do that and then they can get out of the house, it’s like a thing of security for them, they’re very appreciative of us,” said Lonnie Angel, of the Center for Employment Opportunities.

South Buffalo resident Jay Burney said, “It’s a pretty frightening scene. We’ve been expecting this flood and it looks like the creek is rising, I haven’t heard the last predictions if it’s going to continue to rise, rain may be coming, snow continues to melt, it’s a scary situation.”

Low-lying homes are in danger of flooding from the Buffalo Creek. Officials and National Guardsmen have laid down almost 1,000 sandbags in the neighborhood of Lexington Green, in West Seneca.

The creek is already known for its ice jamming problems and last year local residents dealt with monstrous flooding. However, they are extremely happy with the strong military response they’ve received.

Some even got emotional when describing it.

Larry Miceli said, “I can’t come up with the words to express the gratitude that I’m feeling for the National Guardsmen who are coming to sandbag our windows.”

“We’re just very thankful for all the support we’ve been receiving and it’s just awful to think this might happen again,” a resident explained.

An emergency response team from West Seneca is staking out Buffalo Creek at the Stevenson Foot Bridge. Two people were standing by all night, to gauge the water levels. They are watching for an ice jam, which could back up and flood west Seneca.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has explained there are dozens of boats, pumps, sand bags to respond to potential emergencies. He said they’re a precautionary measure, noting he hopes they don’t need to use the tools they’ve brought in. Officials have brought materials from the following list to several staging areas, one of which is Erie Community College’s north campus.

Read more: http://wivb.com/2014/11/24/wnyers-keep-close-eye-on-creek-levels/

 

 

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13 Nonprofits Get Grants to Encourage Openness in Philanthropy

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November 20, 2014

By Debra E. Blum
A new, seven-foundation partnership created to support nonprofits working to collect feedback and be more effective today announced its first round of grants.

The Fund for Shared Insight has awarded 13 organizations a total of $5.26-million in 14 separate grants of one to three years, designed “to accelerate the culture of listening” among nonprofits, according to Melinda Tuan, a spokesman for the group.

A news release says the grants are intended “to encourage and incorporate feedback from the people the social sector seeks to help; understand the connection between feedback and better results; foster more openness between and among foundations and grantees; and share lessons.”

The biggest single award—$700,000 for one year—will go to GlobalGiving, an online fundraising site that connects donors with development projects overseas. Ms. Tuan says the money will support GlobalGiving’s efforts to build, test, and share new tools to help nonprofits collect feedback from their constituents. One example is Global Giving’s Storytelling Project, an effort to learn what residents of other countries think about the nonprofits that serve them.

Habitat for Humanity International, among the largest charities to receive a grant, was awarded $600,000 for up to three years to improve and systematize the way it gathers and uses feedback from residents in the 220 U.S. communities where it works.

Keystone Accountability, a nonprofit consultant that developed Constituent Voice, a feedback tool used by many organizations (including at least a handful of the other grantees), will get $300,000 to develop Feedback Commons, an effort to openly share resources and research among nonprofits.

The Fund for Shared Insight, created in July, is a collaboration among the Rita Allen, Ford, William and Flora Hewlett, JPB, W.K. Kellogg, and David and Lucile Packard Foundations, along with the charitable arm of Liquidnet, a financial trading company. Together, the organizations have committed $18-million over three years, with plans to give away at least $5-million to $6-million a year, or more if additional grant makers join.

The fund, which received nearly 200 proposals for its first round of grants, plans to provide individualized feedback to all rejected applicants—that pledge, it said, was part of how it hoped to show grant makers ways to promote openness about decision making. It also plans to circulate a survey to get applicants’ views on the grants process and ideas on how to improve it.

The additional grantees announced today are: The Center for Employment Opportunity, Feedback Labs, LIFT, the Center for Effective Philanthropy (for its YouthTruth project and for separate research), Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, a joint project by the Urban Institute and Feeding America, Creative Commons, Exponent Philanthropy, the Foundation Center, and GiveWell.

Read more: http://philanthropy.com/article/13-Nonprofits-Get-Grants-to/150165/

 

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Another Voice: Workforce development plays key role in job market

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By Jeffrey M. Conrad

A recent Buffalo News article highlighted the need for skilled workers in Buffalo’s growing economy. The article aptly stated that our educational institutions will play a critical role in preparing students for tomorrow’s job market. However, our next workforce is years from entering the job market. Industries such as health care, advanced manufacturing, construction and tourism are expanding now, creating an immediate need for trained and skilled workers. Workforce development can and should play a pivotal role in meeting today’s workforce needs.

The economic development boom we are experiencing translates into jobs, and for workforce development agencies this means opportunities. Often times the “next big job market” simply never arrives, thus wasting time and money. However, this time is different, the jobs are here and many more are on the way. There is no guessing game, thanks to the Western New York Regional Economic Development Council and Empire State Development, which developed regional priorities that will provide the Buffalo area with opportunities for high-paying jobs for years to come.

There is no doubt that our region will be able to fill some of these jobs through many of the 8,000 college students that graduate locally each year, or through displaced Buffalonians who want to return home. However, we cannot dismiss the fact that there is a large constituency of undereducated, less-skilled workers currently living in poverty in the City of Buffalo who can benefit tremendously from current job opportunities. A large majority of these residents want to enter or re-enter the workplace, and many more incumbent workers are hoping to make a transition to these higher-paying jobs.

However, many residents are not sure how to gain access to these sectors, nor do they know what services or trainings are available.

Disconnect between residents and stakeholders is just one of several barriers that prohibit job seekers from finding gainful employment. Transportation, low literacy and math skills, and no money for vocational training are additional obstacles for many wishing to advance. All of these barriers can be remedied if the NFTA, the private sector, adult education and workforce development agencies come to the table and build a system that works for our regional needs. Today’s economic boom is a chance for Buffalo to reinvent itself.

This is not just about filling jobs; there are much larger impacts both socially and governmentally attached to building an effective workforce development system. Buffalo’s poverty statistics are very concerning, but most should be alleviated by providing ample opportunity for all residents who want to benefit from today’s progress.

Jeffrey M. Conrad is regional director of the Center for Employment Opportunities.

Read more: http://www.buffalonews.com/opinion/another-voice/another-voice-workforce-development-plays-key-role-in-job-market-20141027

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Buffalo Bills Discounted Tickets Sale to Support CEO

The Buffalo Bills and the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County have extended an opportunity for for Bills fans to not only obtain discounted tickets for the Buffalo Bills vs. Cleveland Browns game on November 30, 2014 at 1:00pm but also to support the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO).  A portion of every ticket purchased using the offer below will allow fans and supporters to deep discounts on tickets. CEO is very thankful to the Bills and the United Way for this opportunity! Please feel free to forward this to family, friends, and post on social media.
As always thank you for your support! Go Bills!Click here to buy: http://bit.ly/BuffaloBillsDiscount Offer code is GPUW

Buffalo Bills Fundraising Offer
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PRESS ENTERPRISE FOUNDATION SPOTLIGHT: Center for Employment Opportunities

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BY REBECCA K. O’CONNOR / THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Published: Oct. 18, 2014 5:38 p.m.

ndo1vm-b88226031z.120141018173831000gd85nd35.10Center for Employment Opportunities is a national organization that opened an office in San Bernardino last year, offering comprehensive employment services exclusively for people with criminal records.
Individuals returning to the community after being incarcerated often have challenges finding employment and reintegrating, and the center has been working to address this problem for more than 30 years. The New York-based nonprofit opened an office in San Bernardino in August 2013, working in partnership with the California State Reentry Initiative, San Bernardino Community College District and Caltrans.
While there are many services available for individuals with criminal records, the center provides employment and employment services. Participants take a weeklong course and then are given a work crew assignment, which helps them get used to a work routine and prepare for employment elsewhere. The center also offers clients support once they have secured a job for the next 365 days, encouraging monthly retention.
“Helping people return to the community and reestablishing stability creates pride and self-worth,” said Sarah Glenn-Leistikow, county director. “From a community perspective, it also improves economic stability.”
The center’s work crews, in partnership with Caltrans, perform roadside maintenance through litter abatement projects throughout the county. Currently, the San Bernardino office staffs two crews, with a goal of serving around 100 participants a year.
“We are a national organization, but we are very invested in our community, with creating partners, new relationships and collaboratives,” said Glenn-Leistikow. “We do a specific thing for a specific group of people, but it wouldn’t be possible without our other partners. We are looking to grow our partnerships, including work crew partnerships.”
According to Glenn-Leistikow, San Bernardino County has the second highest rate of people returning home from incarceration in the state. The organization offers its services countywide. While the center’s model is the same across the country and generally the programs are the same, working in San Bernardino County has its own challenges, the largest of which is the geographic expanse of the area.
“San Bernardino is one of the largest geographic counties in the country,” said Glenn-Leistikow. “There are real challenges to getting to work. It might take three hours on a bus. So managing meetings, classes and childcare as well as employment can become really prohibitive.”
Despite the challenges, in the year since the office opened, clients have had many successes.
“We had our first participant who made his 365-day mark,” said Glenn-Leistikow. “So he was placed and has been with the employer for over a year. He has a union job with benefits, which is a massive turnaround in that time period.”
Glenn-Leistikow also noted that some of the participants come into the program and earn the first pay check of their life.
“Having gainful employment makes people feel so much more positive about their lives. It also makes it less likely for them to return to the system,” she said.
Finding funding for programming has similar challenges to other nonprofit organizations. However, the center is slightly different, because close to 50 percent of the budget is met through contracts such as the current agreement with Caltrans. The center recently received a grant from the S.L. Gimbel Foundation through the Community Foundation to support vocational services and is hoping to expand programming with more work crews in the future.
Glenn-Leistikow noted that there are many social assumptions about people who have a criminal conviction, but overall, her experience has been that their clients are extremely hard-working and dedicated.
“We can tell after a year that the services are even more needed than we anticipated. We are excited to grow here and to be digging into the work for a long time,” she said.
To find out more about Center for Employment Opportunities visit ceoworks.org or call 909-380-8822.
The Community Foundation’s mission is to strengthen Inland Southern California through philanthropy. TCF does that by raising, stewarding and distributing community assets, working toward their vision of a vibrant, generous and just region—with unlimited opportunities. In 2014, the foundation has a renewed focus on building its endowment to ensure that The Community Foundation is here for good. Information: 951-241-7777 or info@thecommunityfoundation.net.

Read more: http://www.pe.com/articles/employment-752281-community-center.html

 

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Cleanliness is Major Part of Levin’s New Fiscal Budget

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Councilmember Steve Levin

Cleanliness is Major Part of Levin’s New Fiscal Budget

North Brooklyn is getting a cleanliness makeover.

Councilmember Steve Levin announced this week that he would be using a chunk of the funding allocated for the new fiscal year to help spruce up the neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Greenpoint.

The new funds directed towards cleanliness are part of a citywide initiative. $3.5 million were added to the City Council’s budget to keep the city streets cleaner as part of a program titled Cleanup NYC Initiative.

Each Councilmember was awarded $68,628 for the cleanup work in their districts.

“Thanks to the City Council’s Cleanup NYC Initiative, I am thrilled that we will be able to help clean and beautify the neighborhoods of the 33rd District,” said Levin. “It is essential that each of our neighborhoods is a great place to live and raise a family and cleanliness is an important factor in accomplishing that. We are partnering with amazing groups to do this work in the 33rd District and I am excited to see these resources be put to good use.”

The funds will be utilized in the maintenance of streets and parks, to introduce new high-end litter baskets, and to beautify public spaces.

The assistance is a much-needed sign of relief for an area that for several years has borne the brunt of the city’s waste. Neighborhood groups like the Greenpoint Waterfront Association for Parks and Planning (GWAPP) and Organizations United for Trash Reduction and Garbage Equity (OUTRAGE) have campaigned for years for the equitable distribution of this burden. Currently, North Brooklyn is home to 19 waste transfer stations and processes about 40 percent of the city’s trash.

And while the Council’s initiative won’t directly address the trash burden, it’s a step towards addressing the growing need of the neighborhood, especially in light of the rapidly escalating real estate developments in the neighborhood and the potential to bring in thousands more people into the neighborhood.

Levin’s office will partner with the Center for Employment Opportunities, the organization that provides life skills and employment opportunities to individuals with criminal records, to carry out the work entailed in the program.

“Engaging formerly incarcerated individuals in neighborhood clean-up and beautification projects provides them with much-needed income and structured job experience, while also encouraging these individuals to be stewards of their own communities,” said Sam Schaeffer, the Executive Director of Center for Employment Opportunities.

There are no dates at present about when the changes will begin taking effect.

 

Read more: http://www.greenpointnews.com/news/6462/cleanliness-is-major-part-of-levin-s-new-fiscal-budget

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Keep Astoria Clean an ongoing focus in the community

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by Andrew Shilling September 23, 2014

Cleanliness has always been a leading concern for business owners and residents in the outer boroughs.

And since City Council budgets were established earlier this summer, programs like the Doe Fund and the Center for Employment Opportunities have been called on for their street maintenance initiatives.

Since taking office this year, Councilman Costa Constantinides has dedicated $160,000 in discretionary funding to the Keep Astoria Clean program in order to provide a more focused approach to litter and graffiti removal services.

“Since the start of the campaign, we have spread the word about what everyone can do and the role we all have in making sure our streets stay clean,” Constantinides said.

Although the program is now in the “maintaining phase,” according to a Constantinides staffer, the councilman stressed that it doesn’t mean things have been put on autopilot.

“This work will continue,” he said. “All community members have the power to Keep Astoria Clean if we work together.”

The councilman has invested $130,000 towards the Doe Fund project on 31st Street between 30th Avenue and Broadway, as well as $30,000 towards graffiti cleanup this year.

Lifelong Astoria resident Veronica Alston said although she has noticed certain areas have gotten attention while others still have work to be done, she explained that the issue is nothing new.

Alston said that while the grounds in the Astoria Houses where she grew up are clean due to the housing maintenance, the surrounding community – along areas on 8th Street – “could do better.”

“There is one trash receptacle on all four corners over here, and the community garden across the street, the sidewalk over there is always a mess,” Alston said, referring to the Two Coves Community Garden on Astoria Boulevard.

Dutch Kills Civic Association president Dominic Stiller said he hopes the Keep Astoria Clean initiative will highlight the amount of red tape that communities have to go through to get programs like the Doe Fund.

“There is a total double-standard when it comes to cleaning neighborhoods,” he explained. “It’s income-based and it took a lot to get our neighborhood at a better level.”

Read more:LIC/Astoria Journal – Keep Astoria Clean an ongoing focus in the community

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Keep Astoria Clean an ongoing focus in the community

LICJ
by Andrew Shilling Sep 23, 2014
Cleanliness has always been a leading concern for business owners and residents in the outer boroughs.

And since City Council budgets were established earlier this summer, programs like the Doe Fund and the Center for Employment Opportunities have been called on for their street maintenance initiatives.

Since taking office this year, Councilman Costa Constantinides has dedicated $160,000 in discretionary funding to the Keep Astoria Clean program in order to provide a more focused approach to litter and graffiti removal services.

“Since the start of the campaign, we have spread the word about what everyone can do and the role we all have in making sure our streets stay clean,” Constantinides said.

Although the program is now in the “maintaining phase,” according to a Constantinides staffer, the councilman stressed that it doesn’t mean things have been put on autopilot.

“This work will continue,” he said. “All community members have the power to Keep Astoria Clean if we work together.”

The councilman has invested $130,000 towards the Doe Fund project on 31st Street between 30th Avenue and Broadway, as well as $30,000 towards graffiti cleanup this year.

Lifelong Astoria resident Veronica Alston said although she has noticed certain areas have gotten attention while others still have work to be done, she explained that the issue is nothing new.

Alston said that while the grounds in the Astoria Houses where she grew up are clean due to the housing maintenance, the surrounding community – along areas on 8th Street – “could do better.”

“There is one trash receptacle on all four corners over here, and the community garden across the street, the sidewalk over there is always a mess,” Alston said, referring to the Two Coves Community Garden on Astoria Boulevard.

Dutch Kills Civic Association president Dominic Stiller said he hopes the Keep Astoria Clean initiative will highlight the amount of red tape that communities have to go through to get programs like the Doe Fund.

“There is a total double-standard when it comes to cleaning neighborhoods,” he explained. “It’s income-based and it took a lot to get our neighborhood at a better level.” 
Read more: http://www.licjournal.com/pages/full_story/push?article-Keep+Astoria+Clean+an+ongoing+focus+in+the+community+=&id=25822773&instance=home_news_2nd_left
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District 33 will see cleaner streets through Cleanup NYC Initiative

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by Jess Berry Sep 23, 2014
Councilman Steve Levin with Rabbi David Neiderman.

Councilman Steve Levin with Rabbi David Neiderman.
A slew of City Council members have recently announced investments in the Doe Fund — an organization that hires recently incarcerated or homeless individuals for street cleaning work — after the start of the City Council’s Cleanup NYC Initiative, which allocated funds to each district for street and park beautification.

Councilman Stephen Levin, who represents North Brooklyn’s 33rd District, strayed from the pack and announced on Monday that he is allocating $53,000 to the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO).

The Cleanup NYC Initiative is budgeting $3.5 million across the city for cleaner streets, awarding each council member $68,628 for cleaning initiatives in their district. Levin will thus be giving the lion’s share of his funding to CEO.

CEO and the Doe Fund share similar approaches, though their platforms vary. CEO hires formerly incarcerated individuals and gives them a job in clean up and beautification. After a few months, CEO helps their workers transition into a full-time job, and then provides retention services for them for a year following their entrance into the work force.

Sam Schaeffer, executive director and chief executive officer of CEO, explained that the non-profit hires people who have the greatest need.

“We recruit folks directly from parole and probation, who are at the highest risk for going back to prison — people who really need our assistance,” Schaeffer said.

He also said that the work his employees would do in District 33 with Levin’s funding would be particularly meaningful.

“We really love what we do,” he said. “This type of work is really good, because we’ll do stuff where we buff the floors of the courthouses every night, which is great, but when you’re in a community, and you’re cleaning up, and you see the difference and you’re being appreciated, it’s a different kind of impact.”

The funding from Levin will provide for four to five months worth of work from CEO, which will have workers out for seven hours a day cleaning streets mostly in Williamsburg and Greenpoint. Funding will also go towards introducing new, high-end litter baskets.

Levin explained that his decision to go with CEO over the Doe Fund was due to his familiarity with the non-profit’s work.

“A lot of council members are choosing the Doe Fund because that’s just the first name that came to mind,” Levin said, “but I was aware CEO does this work in a slightly different model.”

In Levin’s mind, the work done by CEO will ideally improve the relationship between residents and their community and push people to do their part in keeping their neighborhoods clean.

“Hopefully it will ensure that people feel more pride in their neighborhood, that they feel safer and there’s an overall sense of a greater quality of life, and the streets are cleaner,” he said. “I think communities will feel better.

“Then that will hopefully have a positive impact in making sure that people do their part to keep the streets cleaner, so I think it can have a positive impact all around, and I think this will go a long way,” he added. “There are a significant amount of resources being put into this.”

Rabbi David Niederman, executive director of the United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburg, joined Levin at the announcement of the funding allocation to extend his appreciation for making “a cleaner Williamsburg.”

“I want to thank council member Stephen Levin for working tirelessly on behalf of the community and for ensuring that our neighborhood is kept clean and beautiful,” Rabbi Niederman said.Read more: http://www.queensledger.com/pages/full_story/push?article-District+33+will+see+cleaner+streets+through+Cleanup+NYC+Initiative+=&id=25822985

 

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$3.5 Million Will Create Jobs, Curb Garbage Juice

Rabbi Niederman speaks at Council Member Stephen Levin's press conference today in Williamsburg (Photo: Nicole Disser)
Rabbi Niederman speaks at Council Member Stephen Levin’s press conference today in Williamsburg (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Today in South Williamsburg, Council Member Stephen Levin announced the allocation of new city funding for cleanup efforts across the city. The program– the City’s Council $3.5 million Cleanup NYC Initiative– aims to install better public trash bins and beautify public spaces and streets while contributing to a generally more, er, sanitizedNew York City. Because apparently having streets in Williamsburg and Greenpoint that the Mayor’s Office rated 83 percent to 96.6 percent “acceptable” is nowhere near clean enough.

Mr. Levin said the $68,628 allocated to the 33rd District will ensure “that our quality of life is maintained.” He said that clean streets lead to a sense of pride in one’s community as well as a “sense of security.”

But the mission isn’t entirely about fancy new “high-end litter baskets” — the 33rd District will be teaming up with the Center for Employment Opportunities to place formerly incarcerated individuals in cleanup positions. “We decided to partner with an organization that consistently delivers services in addition to providing opportunities for individuals who are facing some of the biggest challenges of anyone in society: those that are reentering society from incarceration,” Mr. Levin said.

Sam Schaeffer, the organization’s executive director, said that the Center for Employment Opportunities “helps men and women coming home from prison when they are having the hardest time finding a job.”

Rabbi David Niederman, director of the United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburg, was also present, and said that he’s happy to see a partnership between the 33rd district and the Center for Employment Opportunities. “It’s about empowering people for their life,” he said. “They come home broken and there is a community that raises them up.”

Read more: http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/09/3-5-million-initiative-will-create-jobs-curb-garbage-juice/#

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